Date in History

Date in History Henry Ford may have believed that “history is bunk”, but most people at most places and most times have disagreed with him. History is a record of people, and peoples – who they were, what they did, and why. History tells stories of courage and cowardice, of selfishness and selflessness, and of… Read More Date in History

The Year in Church and Religious History

3 Jan – Pope Leo X excommunicated Martin Luther, the Protestant Reformer, in his papal bull Decet Romanum Pontificem, after Luther refused to recant his writings as required by the 1520 papal bull Exsurge Domine (1521). 6 Jan – Epiphany, the traditional date of the arrival of the Magi (Three Kings) to the Holy Family… Read More The Year in Church and Religious History

The Year in Military History

The Year in Military History 1-8 Jan – French forces under the Duke of Guise conquered the fortress at Calais, the last English territory in France (1558). 2 Jan – Delaware and Wyandot Indians surprised and massacred 11 eleven men, one woman and two children in the Big Bottom Massacre in southeastern Ohio (1791). 3… Read More The Year in Military History

The Bible – Word Above All Words

The Bible is the most popular, and controversial, book in human history. There are those who love and live by it, those who revile and attack it, and those who ignore it. Great leaders in the past have honored it: “The New Testament is the very best book that ever was or ever will be… Read More The Bible – Word Above All Words

Living History at Gettysburg on the Sesquicentennial

Some families enjoy history. Mine has reconnoitered the fields at Saratoga, examined the batteries at Fort McHenry, walked the decks of the USS Wisconsin, and explored the beaches at Normandy.  On Independence Day weekend my oldest son David, my oldest daughter Anna, and I enjoyed another famous battlefield, Gettysburg. We arrived at the actual battlefield,… Read More Living History at Gettysburg on the Sesquicentennial

The Land of Milk and Honey – Agriculture in Ancient Israel

In Exodus 33:3 God promised to take the Hebrews, recently freed from slavery in Egypt, to a “land flowing with milk and honey.” During my trip to Israel in March of 1995 when I approached Jerusalem, I was a little skeptical of the “milk and honey” description. Much of the land is dry and hilly,… Read More The Land of Milk and Honey – Agriculture in Ancient Israel

What Was the Most Important Part of Luther’s Theology?

Luther’s allegiance to the Holy Bible (solo Scriptura) as the ultimate source of authority in Christianity was the most important point of his theology. It is hard for Christians in the 21st century to imagine how the first 350 years of the faith must have been, when the only Bible available was the Old Testament,… Read More What Was the Most Important Part of Luther’s Theology?

Preparation for the Reformation

In Leviathan, English philosopher Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679) characterized the life of man as “solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short”. He was referring to the trials of his own day, as well as those of the decades preceding him, the time of the Reformation. European life in the late 15th century certainly fit Hobbes description. Under… Read More Preparation for the Reformation

The Benadictines

Ours is a day of self-indulgence, where we are promised to “have it our way” and told “you deserve a break today”.   Famous songs trumpet “I did it my way” and anything and everything, from privacy to health care to “self-expression”, has become a right.  Few would argue for self-denial and some even hold that… Read More The Benadictines