Advent Tree Family Devotions – December 12


December 12 – Shepherd’s Crook

Exodus 12; Numbers 27:16-17; Isaiah 53:6; Psalm 23; John 1:29; 10:11‑18

More than any other class of livestock, sheep require constant and meticulous care.  Sheep are timid and fearful, stubborn and stupid, and will move with the mob, even to their own destruction.  At the sight of a predator, sheep panic, losing their babies through miscarriage and even their lives in unrestrained fear.  Within the flock there is tension, rivalry, and cruel competition.  Sheep lead other sheep down treacherous paths and then butt them into injury.  Sheep are notorious for getting “cast down”, in which they have rolled on to their back with their feet in the air.  A “cast down” sheep is helpless to right itself, and will die in a few hours if not turned upright.  Sheep that have too much wool, are too fat, or rest too long in a soft and easy place are in grave danger of being cast down. 

A brief look at human behavior in the past, and in the present, is enough to make anyone with insight realize that people are very much like sheep.  That is why we desperately need a shepherd.   

A good shepherd loves his sheep.  He walks with them over many hard miles, carries them when they hurt, protects them from predators, and sleeps with them in the cold.  He finds food and water for them even in rough places, lifts them up when they are cast down, and is willing to put their needs before his own.   Jesus Christ is our Good Shepherd.  The Shepherd’s Crook is a symbol of the shepherd and was one of the earliest symbols used by Christians. It helped them find strength and comfort, and the courage to face ridicule and persecution.

The Shepherd’s Crook also reminds us that the lamb was sacrificed in Old Testament worship to atone for the peoples’ sins.  The blood of the lamb protected the Children of Israel from the Angel of Death when it was passing over the Egyptians in judgment.  Ultimately, Jesus’ sacrificed Himself for the sins of the whole world.  He is the true and final “Lamb of God”. 

We can never understand human behavior until we accept that we truly are like sheep.  How often do we remark, when told of another’s foolish act or sin, “How could he have done that?”  Instead we must realize that without the common grace of God given to all men, and the special grace given to those who trust Him, mankind could never do anything else. We cannot exalt in the pinnacle of grace until we confess the depth of depravity of the human heart. 

Jesus, the Lamb of God, took the just penalty for all of our sins upon Himself.  Jesus, the Good Shepherd, cares for His sheep, protects them, and loves them.  The power and life of what He did, and does, for us, beggars description.  Take a few minutes, or hours, to meditate on Him and His works.  Whenever you see a sheep or a shepherd’s crook, let these memories and thoughts flood your heart with a peace that only the Lord can provide. 


O Little Town of Bethlehem

 

O little town of Bethlehem
How still we see thee lie
Above thy deep and dreamless sleep
The silent stars go by
Yet in thy dark streets shineth
The everlasting Light
The hopes and fears of all the years
Are met in thee tonight

For Christ is born of Mary
And gathered all above
While mortals sleep, the angels keep
Their watch of wondering love
O morning stars together
Proclaim the holy birth
And praises sing to God the King
And Peace to men on earth

How silently, how silently
The wondrous gift is given!
So God imparts to human hearts
The blessings of His heaven.
No ear may his His coming,
But in this world of sin,
Where meek souls will receive him still,
The dear Christ enters in.

O holy Child of Bethlehem
Descend to us, we pray
Cast out our sin and enter in
Be born to us today
We hear the Christmas angels
The great glad tidings tell
O come to us, abide with us
Our Lord Emmanuel

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